Vegan Peanut Butter Banana Muffins

Vegan Peanut Butter Banana Muffins

Do you frequently have bananas that are past their prime? Tired of the same old banana bread? If you answered yes to one or both of these questions, Vegan Peanut Butter Banana Muffins is the solution! They are healthy enough to eat for breakfast, but delicious enough to eat for a snack, dessert or any time of day. I tend to think that making muffins is better than making a loaf, because they 1) take about half the time to bake as a loaf, and 2) are easy to portion, no slicing required.

Vegan Peanut Butter Banana Muffins

This recipe comes together quickly and easily. The best part is that you can mix it all in one bowl, so you don’t have much to clean up. These vegan peanut butter banana muffins call for millet, which you probably do not have on hand. Yes, millet looks like bird seed, but it really adds a nice crunch to your muffins and makes them look prettier too. So don’t leave them out. Make the extra effort to get your hands on some. You won’t regret it. I have found that I like millet so much that I am trying to figure out ways to incorporate it into other recipes. You’ll probably be seeing it here again in the future.

Vegan Peanut Butter Banana Muffins

These vegan peanut butter banana muffins also call for that powdered peanut butter stuff. I avoided this stuff for quite a while, because it just seemed weird to me. But one day, while on Instagram, I saw a recipe where someone used the powdered peanut butter, and I knew I needed to get some. So far, I haven’t been disappointed. PB Fit works great in this recipe, and I have also used it for a chocolate peanut butter banana smoothie. If you don’t want to commit to powdered peanut butter, you can try using regular peanut butter, but I’m not sure what your results will be. Please let me know how it worked in the comments below, if you do decide to use regular peanut butter.

I am giving you weights for a lot of the ingredients in this recipe. If you haven’t bought a decent cheap kitchen scale yet, what are you waiting for? Do it! You dirty a lot less dishes when you weigh your ingredients. That alone should be incentive enough. I have been through a few kitchen scales already and really like my current one, which I bought from Amazon. It is the Ozeri Pronto Digital Multifunction Kitchen & Food Scale, and currently costs $13.95. It weighs in grams, milliliters, pounds and ounces. The best part is that it takes regular batteries. All of the scales that I had in the past used the same type of batteries that wrist watches use. Those batteries are expensive, come in many different sizes and are a pain to find. So, please, if you haven’t already, get yourself a kitchen scale.

Vegan Peanut Butter Banana Muffins

Vegan Peanut Butter Banana Muffins

  • 300 grams (about 3) very ripe banana, mashed
  • 120 grams (1/2 cup) organic sugar, (natural, light brown or dark brown, whichever you have on hand & want to use)
  • 120 grams (1/2 cup) sunflower oil
  • 2 Tablespoons organic flax seeds, ground (measure them whole and then grind them)
  • 60 grams (1/2 cup) organic oat flour (I buy organic whole rolled oats and then grind them in my coffee grinder, usually at the same time as the flax seeds)
  • 150 grams (1 cup) organic whole wheat flour
  • 48 grams (1/2 cup) organic PB Fit (powdered peanut butter)
  • 1/4 cup of organic raw millet (I buy mine dirt cheap in the bulk section of Whole Foods)
  • 1 Tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon pink Himalayan salt or sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon organic vanilla extract

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit (175 C). Line a 12-cup muffin pan with cupcake liners.

In a large mixing bowl, mix together mashed banana, sugar and oil. Add the rest of the ingredients and stir until well combined.

Scoop your batter out evenly between the 12 muffin cups. It should take about 1/3 cup for each one. If you have a 1/3 cup portion scoop, it makes life easier. I don’t. I have a 1/4 cup scoop, so I use that but scoop a little extra each time. Just do what you can to make them as much the same size as possible. They will bake more evenly that way and all finish baking at the same time.

Pop them into the oven. They will take anywhere between 20 and 30 minutes to bake. You will know when they are done with the old toothpick test. Take a toothpick and insert it in the center of the center-most muffin. If it comes out clean, then they are done. Make sure you rotate the muffins halfway through bake time. When they are finished, allow to cool in the pan for 5 or 10 minutes. Then remove them from the pan and place them on a cooling rack to finish cooling.

Enjoy them any time!

organic pizza dough

Organic Pizza Dough Recipe

For many years I have known that the key to fantastic pizza is the crust. The crust is the base for everything that gets added on. You must always start with a good base. Everyone has his or her preferred toppings, but the base or crust remains the same.

I have tried different recipes for different pizza crusts over the years. It was always a frustrating and disappointing experience. Within the last year, I read the book American Pie by Peter Reinhart, which is a book about the authors search for the best pizza. He traveled the United States and Italy eating all different kinds of pizza. Reinhart shares the story of his travels in the first half of the book and then shares recipes in the second half. After reading the stories, I decided to try his recipe for Napoletana pizza dough. The first time, I made the recipe exactly the way the recipe is written. It turned out well, even if the pizza crusts weren’t exactly round or even in thickness. I’m not a professional pizzaioli. I decided to tweak the recipe to make the dough a little easier to work with, healthier and a bit more tasty.

So here’s what I did. By using a mixture of organic all purpose flour and organic whole wheat flour, I made the dough stronger, so that it doesn’t tear so easily, more healthy and tasty. I also added more salt that Reinhart called for. I use sea salt instead of kosher or iodized salt. If you don’t like as much salt or are on a low-sodium diet, you can cut the salt in my recipe by half. Now, here’s how you make it.

As you may know from reading earlier posts, I like to weigh my ingredients. Having exact measurements, especially when dealing with breads and bakery products, is extremely important if you want it to turn out the same each time. Even then, temperature and humidity differences can change your end result as well, but we don’t necessarily have control over those factors. Therefore, it is important to control the factors that you can. With that said, I am going to give you the recipe with the flour and water by weight. If you want to convert it to cups, one cup of all-purpose flour weighs 4.25 ounces and one cup of whole wheat flour weighs 4 ounces.

First, combine 15 ounces of room temperature water with 1 teaspoon of instant yeast in the bowl of an electric mixer. Let this sit while you do the next step. Combine 12 and a half ounces of organic all-purpose flour, 10 ounces of organic whole wheat flour and 1 tablespoon of sea salt. Mix these together with your mixer’s dough hook. Add this flour mixture to your water/yeast mixture. Mix with the dough hook on medium speed of your electric mixer for 4 minutes. Let the dough rest for 5 minutes, then mix at medium/low speed for 2 additional minutes.

organic pizza dough

 

When you have finished mixing the dough, you will want to turn the dough out onto a floured surface, working the dough into a smooth ball.

organic pizza dough

Oil a large ceramic or stainless steel bowl with your favorite oil (olive oil, coconut oil, butter, etc.). Put your dough ball into this oiled bowl, turning to coat all sides. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and put in a warm area where it will not be disturbed for an hour and a half.

organic pizza dough

 

After the hour and a half has passed, put your pizza dough bowl into the refrigerator for at least 2 hours. Then, take the pizza dough out of the refrigerator at least two hours before you are ready to make your pizza. You have to get the dough back to room temperature before you will be able to work with it. During all of this time in and out of the refrigerator, the yeast will be working its magic on the dough. If you would like to know more about how yeast works on dough, Peter Reinhart has another book at explains it called, The Bread Baker’s Apprentice.

Once your dough has reached room temperature and you are ready to make your pizzas, put a pizza stone into your oven and preheat the oven to 425 degrees. If you don’t have a pizza stone, don’t worry about it. You can still make pizza without it. I bake my pizza on the middle oven rack with a pizza stone. If you don’t have a pizza stone, you might want to move your oven rack down a bit lower. Experiment with it to see which level turns out the best pizza.

Generously flour your work surface where you will be shaping the pizza dough. Remove your dough from the bowl as gently as possible and place it on your floured work surface. Using a bench scraper or sharp knife, cut the dough into four or six equal pieces. For me, since my pizza dough stretching skills are limited, six dough balls makes six personal sized pizzas, four makes normal small sized pizzas. If you are going for making those 18-inch pizzas, the you might want to just cut the dough in half. Form the cut pieces into smooth dough balls.

organic pizza dough

Take one of your dough balls and start stretching it evenly to form a circle. After a few, I decided that if I roll it with a rolling pin a bit, then work it with my knuckles from the edges, it turns out better. I even tried doing the pizza toss thing, and the dough held up fine. Just be sure you don’t drop it on the floor. My advice is to shape the dough however it is the easiest and least frustrating for you. As you can see, my first one didn’t turn out as a perfect circle.

organic pizza dough

 

Once you have your dough formed, you have a choice. If you have a pizza peel and know how to use it. Then proceed with preparing that and all your toppings. I don’t have a pizza peel. I have a pizza pan that has holes in it, so it still works on the pizza stone. If you have a pizza pan, then move your dough to the pan so that you can start putting on your toppings. Red sauce is not my favorite, so it is rarely on my pizza. Instead, I brush the dough with organic extra-virgin olive oil, sprinkle garlic granules and a little bit of sea salt over the whole thing and then proceed with the rest of my toppings. Pesto is another one of my favorites to use as a base sauce. You know what your favorites are, so do it the way you like it.

organic pizza dough

 

On this pizza, I went very basic and just used pesto, mushrooms and shredded mozzarella cheese. If only I had some sun-dried tomatoes!

organic pizza dough

 

Bake your pizza in the oven, depending on the size of your pizza and the amount of toppings, anywhere from 10 to 15 minutes, turning halfway through for even baking. If you made your pizza crust extra thick, you may need to bake it longer. Or bake a shorter time if you made your crust really thin. Keep an eye on it. Pull it out when you think it looks like the perfect pizza to you. I like my cheese a bit on the well done side, so my finished pizza might not appeal to you, if you like yours cooked for less time. It’s all about customizing it to your own taste. That’s why you are making it at home. So you can get exactly what you want!

organic pizza dough

 

Organic Pizza Dough Recipe

  • 12 1/2 oz. organic all-purpose flour
  • 10 oz. organic whole wheat flour
  • 1 Tbsp. sea salt
  • 1 tsp. instant yeast
  • 15 ounces water, room temperature

In the bowl of an electric mixer, combine water and yeast. In a large bowl, combine flours and salt. Mix flours and salt together well. Add the flour mixture to the yeast and water mixture. Using the dough hook, mix on medium speed for 4 minutes. Let the dough rest for 5 minutes. Mix again on medium-low speed for 2 additional minutes.

Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and work the dough into a smooth ball. Transfer dough to an oiled bowl turning to coat the dough on all sides. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and leave in a warm, undisturbed area for 1 1/2 hours.

Move bowl of dough to the refrigerator for at least 2 hours. Remove dough from refrigerator at least 2 hours before you are ready to make pizza, to bring dough to room temperature.

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Turn dough out onto floured work surface. Using a bench scraper or sharp knife, cut dough into 4 or 6 equal pieces. Form your pizza crusts. Top with your favorite toppings. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes depending on the size of your pizza and your own preferences. Remove from oven. Let cool 5 minutes. Cut and enjoy!